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  • Edi Hila. Painter of Transformation
    24 May - 29 July 2018

    National Gallery of Arts, Tirana Edi Hila. Painter of Transformation 25/05 –  29/07/2018 Curators: Kathrin Rhomberg, Erzen Shkololli, Joanna Mytkowska Loans by Kontakt: Edi Hila: 5 paintings of the series "A tent on the roof of a car" (K712-K716) 18 drawings of the series "The Poultry" (K694-K711) The National Gallery of Arts presents the first retrospective exhibition of Edi Hila in Albania. Edi Hila was born in Shkodra in 1944. He lives and works in Tirana. In addition to his artistic practice, Hila is an influential teacher associated with the University of Arts in Tirana. Educated in Shkodra, a city with ancient beginnings, Hila experimented with forms that ran counter to the realist aesthetics propagated during his studies in the 1960s. In 1972 he painted Planting of Trees, a pleasant picture rendered slightly unreal through the use of color, which because of its departure from the approved socialist realist doctrine, soon became a pretext for ordering him to work in a factory as punishment. But before the communist authorities took offence and doomed his chances for practicing art, he briefly visited Florence in 1973, where he was sent as a promising artist and scenographer for Albanian television. Contact with the Florentine museums and Renaissance painting had a huge impact on Hila. For his departure from socialist realism, Hila was sent to work for three years at a poultry plant where his main task was hauling sacks. In the evenings of 1975-1976 he secretly created a series of drawings called “Poultry”, documenting the life of the workers and harrowing in their raw realism. In the 1990s, seeking a path back to painting, Hila carefully observed life evolving after the fall of the communist regime and tried to depict the realities of the Albanian transformation. The groundbreaking series “Comfort” (1997) captures the insatiable consumer utopia promised to the society. Hila created the series in response to the dramatic crisis caused by the collapse of financial pyramid schemes,which drove the country into chaos. Hila primarily works in series treating a selected theme over several paintings. The most important of Hila’s series include “Paradox” (2000–2005), “Relations” (2002–2014), “Threat” (2003–2009), “Roadside Objects” (2007–2010), “Penthouses” (2013), “Martyrs of the Nation Boulevard” (2015) and “Tent on the Roof of a Car” (2017). The realism of his painting is distinct, based on careful observation of detail, which he exploits to convey the psychological truth of the observed phenomenon. Hila carefully selects the themes for his painting series. In his version, this strips the transformation in Eastern Europe of accident or adventure typical of many presentations of this time, and gives it the weight of distilled general truths, as if he were its final chronicler. One of the reasons for such radical reduction may be Hila’s leaning toward classicism, a fascination with Renaissance sources of painting. It is as if modernism has evaporated from his field of interest. This is why the transformation, in collision with the classical tradition of painting and balance understood in the distant spirit of the Renaissance, conveys so clearly the disruption and attack on harmony and order in Hila’s work. On the other hand, it is rooted in human dilemmas that are hard to conceal, even with a veneer of modernization. Exhibition architecture: Büro Meyer-Grohbrügge A joint project of the National Gallery of Arts in Albania, the Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw and Kontakt Collection in Vienna.

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1 July − 15 Oct 2017
Edward Krasiński

Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

Edward Krasiński
01/07/17 –  15/10/17

Loans by Kontakt: Edward Krasiński, Untitled, 1965; Edward Krasiński, Retrospective, 1984

Curated by Leontine Coelewij

The Stedelijk Museum presents the first retrospective in the Netherlands of Edward Krasiński (1925-2004), one of the most notable Eastern European artists of the 20th century and a leading figure in the Polish avant-garde of the 1960s and 1970s.

The exhibition explores Krasiński’s entire artistic career, from the sculptures made using found objects in the early 1960s, to the installations produced at the turn of the 21st century. Krasiński took an experimental approach to making and exhibiting his art. Krasiński was inspired by pre-war avant-garde movements such as Polish Constructivism. In his work, he combined a wry sense of humour with a Dadaist fascination with chance.

Inspired by prewar avant-garde movements such as Polish Constructivism, Krasiński’s work combines a wry sense of humor and a fascination with chance. The retrospective features over fifty works, including suspended objects and wire sculptures, that testify to his interest in sculpture as line. In 1968 he introduced blue Scotch tape into his work. This simple, ready-to-use material, with which he connected spaces and objects, would become his trademark. Explaining its role in his work, he said, “I place it horizontally at a height of 130 centimeters everywhere and on everything. I encompass everything with it and go everywhere.”

The turbulent summer of 1968 saw Polish students and intelligentsia protesting for greater freedom. After quashing the revolt, the government prohibited gatherings of more than three people. Krasiński and his friends challenged the regime by organizing Farewell to Spring, a ball to which the most influential figures of the Polish avant-garde were invited. Held in a carnivalesque setting, the event was a fusion of installation, happening, and party. It was an important moment for Krasiński – from that point on, his focus centered on transforming his immediate environment.

The exhibition presents spatial installations by Krasiński in which he paired photography and sculpture. Krasiński’s Warsaw studio – where he lived, worked, and hosted gatherings of artists, writers, and intellectuals – is the subject of a film, Edward Krasiński’s Studio (2012), by French-American filmmaker Babette Mangolte. The retrospective also explores the less well-known performative aspects of his work, as well as his connection with artists such as Daniel Buren and Tadeusz Kantor.

KRASIŃSKI AND THE STEDELIJK MUSEUM

Krasiński’s work is related to the minimal and conceptual art movements of the 1960s and ’70s, international movements that are amply represented in the Stedelijk Museum’s collection. While Krasiński’s oeuvre, itself a valuable contribution to modern art, has been rediscovered in recent years by a younger generation of artists and curators, it remains largely unfamiliar to the general public. According to curator Leontine Coelewij, “Krasiński is comparatively unrecognized because we previously knew very little about what went on in the communist countries behind the Iron Curtain. At the time, we were hardly aware that modern art was also being made in Poland. This exhibition underscores the significance of his career, which spanned four decades.


http://www.stedelijk.nl/en?gclid=CK_Z6JKIg9QCFUMo0wodWbEBEg