News

  • Luchezar Boyadjiev. Sic Transit Media Mundi (The Present is Too Short and Rather Tight)
    14 Feb −11 March 2018

    Sofia City Gallery, Bulgaria Luchezar Boyadjiev. Sic Transit Media Mundi (The Present is Too Short and Rather Tight) 14/02 –  11/03/18 Curators: Iara Boubnova, Maria Vassileva, Vladiya Mihaylova and Daniela Radeva. Loan by Kontakt: Luchezar Boyadjiev, Home/Town, 1998/2018 (K321) Luchezar Boyadjiev is among the most prominent contemporary Bulgarian artists. A founding member of the Institute of Contemporary Art in Sofia and an author with an extensive international practice, Boyadjiev is a public figure with a particularly significant critical stance in the Bulgarian art scene. As an artist, curator, lecturer, he contributes to the establishing of new definitions and art practices in the country. This exhibition is his first retrospective in Bulgaria, which shows his experience of over 20 years of creative practice. It features works from the early 1990s until the present day, among them author's replicas and reconstructions of essential and rarely exhibited works. On display will be some of the artist's earliest works created in the chaotic times of euphoria and hopes for change immediately following the 1989 events. They have been exhibited primarily outside the country, and have been included in international historical exhibitions such as "Beyond Belief: Contemporary Art from East Central Europe", 1995, “After the Wall: Art and Culture in Post-Communist Europe”, 1999, “Blood & Honey / Future’s in the Balkans”, 2003, and many more. Over the years, the artist has participated in biennials, group exhibitions and conferences spanning from Sao Paulo to Santa Fe and Gwangju as well as almost everywhere in Europe. His works are part of many museum collections worldwide, the largest part of them in Bulgaria being owned by the Sofia City Art Gallery in its collection of contemporary art. Luchezar Boyadjiev’s entire creative work represents an accurate, richly humourous, knowledgeable and critical visual study of the present. It reveals his extensive knowledge of the Bulgarian and international history of art as well as of the current problems of modernity. His works are related to the reorganization of social, ideological and religious power hierarchies, with the shift in values and a study of the relationships between personal and public space, global and local territories, with the search for the points of intersection of capitalism and democracy, consumerism and the new lifestyle patterns. The artist is interested in the issues of the memory and the past that defines the profile of various locations and circumstances, but also in possible projections into the future. His works bring the two vectors together to shape the identity of the present. http://www.sghg.bg/en/?page=izbrana_izlojba&exhibition=2018.02.14-2018.03.11

News

back to News Overview
Media File
1 July − 15 Oct 2017
Edward Krasiński

Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

Edward Krasiński
01/07/17 –  15/10/17

Loans by Kontakt: Edward Krasiński, Untitled, 1965; Edward Krasiński, Retrospective, 1984

Curated by Leontine Coelewij

The Stedelijk Museum presents the first retrospective in the Netherlands of Edward Krasiński (1925-2004), one of the most notable Eastern European artists of the 20th century and a leading figure in the Polish avant-garde of the 1960s and 1970s.

The exhibition explores Krasiński’s entire artistic career, from the sculptures made using found objects in the early 1960s, to the installations produced at the turn of the 21st century. Krasiński took an experimental approach to making and exhibiting his art. Krasiński was inspired by pre-war avant-garde movements such as Polish Constructivism. In his work, he combined a wry sense of humour with a Dadaist fascination with chance.

Inspired by prewar avant-garde movements such as Polish Constructivism, Krasiński’s work combines a wry sense of humor and a fascination with chance. The retrospective features over fifty works, including suspended objects and wire sculptures, that testify to his interest in sculpture as line. In 1968 he introduced blue Scotch tape into his work. This simple, ready-to-use material, with which he connected spaces and objects, would become his trademark. Explaining its role in his work, he said, “I place it horizontally at a height of 130 centimeters everywhere and on everything. I encompass everything with it and go everywhere.”

The turbulent summer of 1968 saw Polish students and intelligentsia protesting for greater freedom. After quashing the revolt, the government prohibited gatherings of more than three people. Krasiński and his friends challenged the regime by organizing Farewell to Spring, a ball to which the most influential figures of the Polish avant-garde were invited. Held in a carnivalesque setting, the event was a fusion of installation, happening, and party. It was an important moment for Krasiński – from that point on, his focus centered on transforming his immediate environment.

The exhibition presents spatial installations by Krasiński in which he paired photography and sculpture. Krasiński’s Warsaw studio – where he lived, worked, and hosted gatherings of artists, writers, and intellectuals – is the subject of a film, Edward Krasiński’s Studio (2012), by French-American filmmaker Babette Mangolte. The retrospective also explores the less well-known performative aspects of his work, as well as his connection with artists such as Daniel Buren and Tadeusz Kantor.

KRASIŃSKI AND THE STEDELIJK MUSEUM

Krasiński’s work is related to the minimal and conceptual art movements of the 1960s and ’70s, international movements that are amply represented in the Stedelijk Museum’s collection. While Krasiński’s oeuvre, itself a valuable contribution to modern art, has been rediscovered in recent years by a younger generation of artists and curators, it remains largely unfamiliar to the general public. According to curator Leontine Coelewij, “Krasiński is comparatively unrecognized because we previously knew very little about what went on in the communist countries behind the Iron Curtain. At the time, we were hardly aware that modern art was also being made in Poland. This exhibition underscores the significance of his career, which spanned four decades.


http://www.stedelijk.nl/en?gclid=CK_Z6JKIg9QCFUMo0wodWbEBEg