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  • Everything we see could also be otherwise (My sweet little lamb)
    20 September – 11 November 2017

    The Showroom (63 Penfold St, Marylebone, London NW8 8PQ, UK) Curated by: What, How & for Whom/WHW, in collaboration with Kathrin Rhomberg, co-curated by Emily Pethick Preview: Tuesday 19 September, 6.30–8.30pm Exhibition opening hours: Wednesday – Saturday, 12–6pm The Showroom presents the epilogue of a long-term project which took place over several months in Zagreb (November 2016 to May 2017), which contextualised and rethought the Kontakt Art Collection. It was curated by What, How & for Whom/WHW in collaboration with Kathrin Rhomberg. This final exhibition is co-curated by The Showroom Director Emily Pethick. Taking selected works from the Vienna-based Kontakt Art Collection as its point of departure, including seminal pieces by some of the most prominent artists from Central, Eastern and South-East Europe since the 1960s, the exhibition stages an interplay between these and other historical, contemporary and newly produced works that interpret and critically examine the collection. The project unfolded in six episodes in Zagreb, each iteration influencing, contradicting and reinforcing each other. It took place in a number of smaller art spaces, artists' studios, private apartments and other locations related to artistic production and the broader cultural landscape of the city. This final stage of the project at The Showroom continues to reframe and expand the context of the collection. Interlacing geographically and poetically heterogeneous artist practices, the project attempts to punctuate standardized presentations and interpretations of works that have dominated international art circuits over the last few decades, with more disorderly and experimental arrangements. The project title is taken from a work by Croatian artist Mladen Stilinović (1947–2016), to whom the project is dedicated. Stilinović's life-long anti-systemic approach, his quiet but shrewd rebellion against social conventions and the conventions of art, and an artistic practice that trenchantly and humorously engages with complex themes of ideology, work, money, pain and poverty, inspired a generation of artists worldwide. The project is a cooperation with Kontakt Art Collection and is supported by Erste Group Bank AG and ERSTE Foundation. http://www.theshowroom.org/ http://www.whw.hr/

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01 July − 15 October 2017
Edward Krasiński

Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

Edward Krasiński
01/07/17 –  15/10/17

Loans by Kontakt: Edward Krasiński, Untitled, 1965; Edward Krasiński, Retrospective, 1984

Curated by Leontine Coelewij

The Stedelijk Museum presents the first retrospective in the Netherlands of Edward Krasiński (1925-2004), one of the most notable Eastern European artists of the 20th century and a leading figure in the Polish avant-garde of the 1960s and 1970s.

The exhibition explores Krasiński’s entire artistic career, from the sculptures made using found objects in the early 1960s, to the installations produced at the turn of the 21st century. Krasiński took an experimental approach to making and exhibiting his art. Krasiński was inspired by pre-war avant-garde movements such as Polish Constructivism. In his work, he combined a wry sense of humour with a Dadaist fascination with chance.

Inspired by prewar avant-garde movements such as Polish Constructivism, Krasiński’s work combines a wry sense of humor and a fascination with chance. The retrospective features over fifty works, including suspended objects and wire sculptures, that testify to his interest in sculpture as line. In 1968 he introduced blue Scotch tape into his work. This simple, ready-to-use material, with which he connected spaces and objects, would become his trademark. Explaining its role in his work, he said, “I place it horizontally at a height of 130 centimeters everywhere and on everything. I encompass everything with it and go everywhere.”

The turbulent summer of 1968 saw Polish students and intelligentsia protesting for greater freedom. After quashing the revolt, the government prohibited gatherings of more than three people. Krasiński and his friends challenged the regime by organizing Farewell to Spring, a ball to which the most influential figures of the Polish avant-garde were invited. Held in a carnivalesque setting, the event was a fusion of installation, happening, and party. It was an important moment for Krasiński – from that point on, his focus centered on transforming his immediate environment.

The exhibition presents spatial installations by Krasiński in which he paired photography and sculpture. Krasiński’s Warsaw studio – where he lived, worked, and hosted gatherings of artists, writers, and intellectuals – is the subject of a film, Edward Krasiński’s Studio (2012), by French-American filmmaker Babette Mangolte. The retrospective also explores the less well-known performative aspects of his work, as well as his connection with artists such as Daniel Buren and Tadeusz Kantor.

KRASIŃSKI AND THE STEDELIJK MUSEUM

Krasiński’s work is related to the minimal and conceptual art movements of the 1960s and ’70s, international movements that are amply represented in the Stedelijk Museum’s collection. While Krasiński’s oeuvre, itself a valuable contribution to modern art, has been rediscovered in recent years by a younger generation of artists and curators, it remains largely unfamiliar to the general public. According to curator Leontine Coelewij, “Krasiński is comparatively unrecognized because we previously knew very little about what went on in the communist countries behind the Iron Curtain. At the time, we were hardly aware that modern art was also being made in Poland. This exhibition underscores the significance of his career, which spanned four decades.


http://www.stedelijk.nl/en?gclid=CK_Z6JKIg9QCFUMo0wodWbEBEg