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  • WHO WAS 1968?
    28 Sept 2018 − 13 Jan 2019

    LENTOS Kunstmuseum WHO WAS 1968? Art, Architecture, Society Curated by: Hedwig Saxenhuber, Georg Schöllhammer Loans by Kontakt from: Heimrad Bäcker, Stanisław Dróżdż, VALIE EXPORT, Stano Filko, Běla Kolářová, Július Koller, Natalia LL, Karel Miler, Petr Štembera, Raša Todosijević and Goran Trbuljak A decade of eruptions, departures and redefinitions in the steel city Linz. The year I968 marks a turning point that ushered in a new era. Across Western Europe and in the United States Student protests and workers’ revolts called into question the post-war power structure itself, while Soviet tanks bulldozed the Prague Spring into the ground and signalled the end of the hope that the Eastern Bloc would open up to the West. This exhibition harks back to the echoes of I968 in Linz and Upper Austria. Embracing the arts, architecture, music, film and literature, it unfolds for the first time a synoptic map on which key figures and moments of local history – some largely unknown to this day – are accorded a place. It enables visitors to embark on exploratory trips and to survey the rich fabric of relationships and linkages that includes points of contact with international scenarios and trends. Experiments in the aesthetic field were begun with a view to escaping from the cultural stuffiness of the first two post-war decades. The participating artists include: Claudia von Alemann, Ant Farm, Heimrad Bäcker, Josef Bauer, Bill Bollinger, Dietmar Brehm, Gerd Conradt, Waltraut Cooper, Stanisław Dróżdż, Erró, VALIE EXPORT, Harun Farocki, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Stano Filko, Helmuth Gsöllpointner, Timo Huber, Johann Jascha, Martha Jungwirth, Gülsün Karamustafa, Gerhard Knogler, Běla Kolářová, Juliús Koller, Peter Kubelka, Zofia Kulik, KwieKulik, Maria Lassnig, Fritz Lichtenauer, Natalia LL, Karel Miler, Josef Nöbauer, OHO, Yoko Ono, Gina Pane, Friederike Pezold, Cora Pongracz, Chris Reinecke, Martha Rosler, Dieter Roth, Zorka Sàglovà, Dominik Steiger, Petr Štembera, Raša Todosijević, Goran Trbuljak, Tucumàn Arde, Jiřì Valoch, Agnés Varda, Peter Weibel, Hannah Wilke, Jana Želibská, Želimir Žilnik, Zünd-Up http://lentos.at/html/en/4747.aspx

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Stano Filko

Stano Filko’s works constitute an open invitation to travel through time. The unity and simultaneous diversity of his oeuvre stem from the following modes of constant change: relocation, rewriting, and rearranging. In the early 1970s, Filko released a detailed work list in a self-published “chronology of creation” 1—a model that he transformed, modified, and subsequently negated. In his work, he fuses divergent impulses into a self-centered system of “personal ontology.” This system has evolved into two parallel lines that are in conflict with each other and thus give rise to a productive field of tensions. The diachronic line of his work charts the realm of identity arranged into the following time-sequential mutations of his name: Filko (1937–1977), Fylko (1978–1987) = 1st Clone; Phylko (1988–1997) = 2nd Clone; Phys (1997–2019) = 3rd Clone. It reflects the turning points in the artist’s style and thematic orientation. Together with Alex Mlynárčik, Filko was a pioneer of the sociological happening (HAPPSOC I–IV, 1965–1968). The modes of expression to be seen in his work appeared to expand by leaps and bounds during the 1960s—running from assemblage to environment, and from graphic works printed on maps to multiplied objects, sound works, project works and text works.

Along the synchronic line of his personal ontology, Filko has clustered the dimensions of space and time into a system of chakras and their five-color spectrum. As he worked on rebuilding his studio in the 1990s, he divided the architectural space into five elemental sections, thematically distinguished by the colors of the chakras.2 He has defined this system, synchronic in essence and thus achronological, as a strategy of self-historicization. It embodies the chakra symbolism in these sections: red/pink represents the sphere of biology, erotica, and empiricism; green links “HAPPSOC” to Filko’s work on geopolitical maps; white stands for ontology and denotes the stages of the 1970s project entitled “A White Space in a White Space”. And blue encompasses the works of the graphic cycle “Associations”, his environments, and his artworks that explore cosmic themes.

D.G.


Notes:

1 Stano FILKO II. 1965/69 TVORBA / WORKS – CREATION / WERK – SCHAFFUNG / OUVRAGES (Bratislava: A-PRESS, 1970).

2 Patricia Grzonka, Stano Filko, in: Brozman, Dušan (ed.): Stano Filko (Praha: Arbor Vitae, 2005).

1937, Velká Hradná / SK, at that time ČSSR – 2015, Bratislava / SK

Filko began his studies at the School of Applied Arts in Bratislava (Slovak Republic) and later studied Monumental Painting at the Academy of Arts from 1960 to 1965. He was a member of the “Happsoc Group” formed around Zita Kostrová and Alexander Młynarczyk. The work of the group became known all over Europe at that time.

Please follow this link for a selected bibliography available at the ERSTE Foundation Library
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  • © National Gallery of Kosovo, Photo: Enver Bylykbashi

  • Photo: Adam Savoky
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